Artists House Music

cathyweeks
Aug-01-2014 4:17pm

Using my photo? Did I inadvertently give rights away by posting it online?

Blog post submitted by: Vanessa Kaster, Esq., LL.M.

 http://iplegalfreebies.wordpress.com/ ; @iplegalfreebies

Using my photo? Did I inadvertently give rights away by posting it online?

It’s so easy and fun to share photographs online that folks often give away rights to their photographs without even realizing it.  HOW DOES THIS HAPPEN?  The terms, conditions and licenses that the photographer agrees to when posting a photograph to various social media and photo-sharing websites often grant other folks broad rights to use posted photographs.  Keep in mind that every social media and photo-sharing website has different terms, conditions and licenses that are agreed to automatically simply by USING the website and POSTING photographs and other content.  These terms, conditions and licenses are modified and updated frequently.

 Here is an interesting and fairly haunting example:  A photograph of a teenager was taken by her youth counselor and posted to his to Flickr account under a broad Creative Commons license that allowed others to use his work in any way, including for commercial purposes, if they credited the photographer. (See the inserted photo).  A slightly edited version of the photograph ended up in an advertising campaign for Virgin Mobil Australia. A lawsuit followed.

 THE TAKE AWAY: Read the terms, conditions and licenses that you are agreeing to when using and posting photographs and other content to social media and photo-sharing websites.  Most popular social media and photo-sharing websites, including FACEBOOKPINTEREST and TWITTER have fairly broad terms, conditions and licenses that change frequently.  Websites post their terms, usually at the bottom of the webpage. These same terms that often give other folks broad rights to use posted content,  also contain the steps to follow if your photographs or other content are being used without your permission on the site and you want to request that it be taken down.

 This post was inspired by a slew of social media comments about a friend of a friend’s photograph that ended up on t-shirts.

 BY: Vanessa Kaster, Esq., LL.M.

 For personalized legal services you are welcome to contact me at vk@kasterlegal.com

See also: Articles about the Virgin Mobil example above from the Sydney Morning Herald and The New York Times; photo of a Virgin Mobil Ad; Flickr’s Creative Commons licenses at https://www.flickr.com/creativecommons/; other blog posts on photo copyright at http://iplegalfreebies.wordpress.com/category/copyright-photos; @iplegalfreebies and www.kasterlegal.com.

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cathyweeks
Jul-18-2014 10:01am

Trademark: to keep bands called THE SUPREMES from popping up in every State

Blog post submitted by: Vanessa Kaster, Esq., LL.M.

http://iplegalfreebies.wordpress.com/ ; @iplegalfreebies

Trademark: to keep bands called THE SUPREMES from popping up in every State

“Yeah, I know and can appreciate what you do (as a trademark attorney working with musicians). Back in the day, different bands called THE SUPREMES were popping up in every State. You can’t have that.” A jazz musician friend said this to me the other day and it was music to my ears.

This is right on point. For a band like THE SUPREMES, who became the most popular female group of the Sixties, owning the trademark of their name grants the trademark owner (Motown Records and now Motown Records’ successor) the exclusive right to use the name “THE SUPREMES” for various music performance and recording services. [USPTO Reg. No. 1003076]. Owning the trademark rights in the name of your band grants the trademark owner the exclusive right to use the trademarked band name for specific uses – like music performance and recording services. This can be a tool to keep other bands or music groups from performing under the same name or a confusingly similar name without permission of the trademark owner.

BY: Vanessa Kaster, Esq., LL.M.

For personalized legal services you are welcome to contact me at vk@kasterlegal.com

See also: the USPTO TESS data base at http://www.uspto.gov/; a copy of the USPTO Certificate of Trademark Registration for THE SUPREMES, USPTO Reg. No. 1003076; The Supremes bio at http://rockhall.com/inductees/the-supremes/ ; Baby Love on YouTube at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=23UkIkwy5ZM; @iplegalfreebies and www.kasterlegal.com.

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cathyweeks
Jun-19-2014 2:58pm

Blog post submitted by: Vanessa Kaster, Esq., LL.M.

http://iplegalfreebies.wordpress.com/

A new class of generic top-level domains (gTLDs) is rolling out, including “.nyc”!  This is a new domain for New Yorkers.  Here is a bit of information about the new .nyc domain from the official website: http://www.nic.nyc/about/  

Who Will Own .nyc?

  • Any New Yorker whose work, ideas and creativity are based in the City.
  • Locals who provide services, products or content to fellow New Yorkers.
  • Companies, organizations and individuals wishing to showcase the value of their location online.

When can I register a .nyc domain name?

It is currently expected that .nyc will launch as early as May 2014 with several registration phases.  

PHASE 1 (May 2014): Trademarks Sunrise (45 days - ending June 20, 2014)

An initial registration period open to  registered trademark owners.

PHASE 2 (June/July 2014): City Government-Affiliated Reserve List (30 days) / Sunrise Auctions

Registration period open to City government and government-affiliated .nyc entities.

PHASE 3 (August/September 2014): Landrush (60 days)

All businesses, organizations and residents with a physical address in the City will have an equal opportunity to register .nyc domains during the Landrush phase. There will be a slightly higher fee for registrations occurring during the Landrush phase. If there is only one application for a .nyc domain name during this period, the applicant for that name will be granted the registration. If there are multiple applications for a domain name during this period, however, an auction will be held to determine the registrant after completion of the Landrush period.

PHASE 4 (October 2014): General Availability

After the Landrush phase, all businesses, organizations and residents with a physical address in the City of New York shall be entitled to register .nyc domain names in real-time on a first-come, first-served basis. For the first ninety (90) days of General Availability, in the event that a domain name registrant applied for a domain name that is an exact match of a trademark appearing in the Trademark Clearinghouse, the registrant will receive a notice about that trademark during the registration process and asked whether or not it wishes to proceed with the registration. If it does, the name will proceed to registration, but may subsequently be challenged by the Trademark owner through an ICANN dispute resolution procedure if the name is likely to cause confusion with the trademark.

For more information see the Official Website at http://www.nic.nyc/  and http://www.nic.nyc/trademarks/.  

For folks outside of NYC, a new generic top-level domain may be launching in your area too.

 BY: Vanessa Kaster, Esq., LL.M.

For personalized legal services you are welcome to contact me at vk@kasterlegal.com

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cathyweeks
Jun-10-2014 11:45am

One can love chicken & Bob Marley tunes (ONE LOVE trademark dispute settles)

Blog post submitted by: Vanessa Kaster, Esq., LL.M.

 http://iplegalfreebies.wordpress.com/

The ONE LOVE trademark dispute between Bob Marley’s estate and Raising Cane’s chicken finger restaurant raises some interesting trademark and copyright issues. According to Louisiana newspapers, the trademark dispute recently settled on undisclosed terms; however, the issue at the heart of the dispute is interesting.

 THE ISSUE: Trademarking someone else’s song title for restaurant services.

 THE STORY: In 2005, Raising Cane’s chicken finger restaurant obtained a USPTO registered trademark for ONE LOVE to be used to sell “restaurant services” (Reg. No. 3033511).  This same phrase ONE LOVE is part of the title and refrain to the famous Bob Marley tune, “One Love/People Get Ready,” recorded with his band The Wailers.  In 2007, Marley’s estate (represented by Fifty-Six Hope Road Music) applied for a USPTO trademark registration for ONE LOVE for “hotel, bar, and restaurant services” but was refused trademark registration because of the pre-existing ONE LOVE trademark registered to Raising Cane’s for similar services.  (A likelihood-of-confusion refusal).  The dispute escalated, the courts became involved and evidently the parties recently settled on undisclosed terms.

 THE SCOOP: As demonstrated by this series of events, the title of a song will not necessarily block or cancel a USPTO trademark application or registration.  Songs and original music are protected by copyright laws; however, copyright protection does not extend to short phrases and titles.  The USPTO trademark registration system is available for protecting short phrases.  Timing of a USPTO application is also a determinative factor.  For example, if Bob Marley’s estate had applied for a ONE LOVE trademark to be used with restaurant and related services BEFORE Raising Cane’s applied for it, then the outcome would likely be reversed and Marley’s estate would have blocked Raising Cane’s trademark application.

 BY: Vanessa Kaster, Esq., LL.M.

 For personalized legal services you are welcome to contact me at vk@kasterlegal.com

 See also: “One Love” dispute transfer order at http://www.scribd.com/doc/206584538/One-Love-dispute-transfer-order; an earlier blog post: Title Copycats; News articles: Raising Cane’s, Bob Marley estate reach agreement by Joe Gyan Jr, Bob Marley’s estate’s legal saga over Raising Cane’s ‘One Love’ to play out in Louisiana by Emily Lane on 2/11/14, and Raising Cane’s, Bob Marley’s estate settle ‘One Love’ slogan dispute by Diana Samuels on 5/23/14; the USPTO trademark search at http://www.uspto.gov/; @iplegalfreebies and www.kasterlegal.com

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cathyweeks
May-21-2014 10:49am

How to use the ®, TM, SM, © symbols for trademark and copyright

Blog post submitted by: Vanessa Kaster, Esq., LL.M.

http://iplegalfreebies.wordpress.com/ 

The ® Registered Trademark Symbol

Once a trademark is federally registered with the USPTO (US Patent & Trademark Office), the coveted ® symbol can be used. While use of the ® symbol is not required, it is highly recommend. Using the ® symbol lends credibility to a registered mark.  Additionally, it puts potential infringers on notice of the trademark owner’s rights and makes it easier for the trademark owner to collect certain damages in the event someone infringes these rights. 

The TM and SM Trademark Symbols

The TM and SM symbols can be used with an unregistered trademark or service mark to inform the public that a word mark, logo, or design mark is being used as a trademark and that the owner of the mark claims rights to it.  Using either of these symbols gives notice that the mark owner is intentionally establishing ‘common law trademark rights’ in the mark. For example:  MY TRADEMARK ™  or MY SERVICE MARK     (For more information on how to use the TM or SM symbols click here).

The © Copyright Symbol

Another familiar symbol is the  copyright symbol.  Using the © symbol is an easy way to notify the world that copyright exists in your original, creative work.  While it’s not required by law to use the © to establish copyright in a photograph, piece of music or other original work, it’s simple to do and could save you a lot of headache down the road.  Use of the the © copyright symbol does not require permission from, or registration with the US Copyright Office.  (For more information on how to write a © copyright notice click here).

Many creative works may contain both a trademark symbol and a copyright notice.   A website, for example, will often contain the website owner’s trademark (registered or unregistered) and a copyright notice.  A CD may have the record label’s registered trademark and the musician’s copyright notice on it.

BY: Vanessa Kaster, Esq., LL.M.

For personalized legal services you are welcome to contact me at vk@kasterlegal.com

See also: USPTO (US Patent & Trademark Office) resources at www.uspto.gov; www.uspto.gov/trademarks/basics/register.jsp; and www.uspto.gov/faq/trademarks.jsp#_Toc275426682; US Copyright Office Circular 3 on Copyright Notice at www.copyright.gov/circs/circ03.pdf; US Copyright Office Circular 1 on Copyright Basics at www.copyright.gov/circs/circ01.pdf; @iplegalfreebies and www.kasterlegal.com.

 

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cathyweeks
May-12-2014 11:54am

Federation Bells Call For Compositions (nice ring to their Terms & Conditions)

Blog post submitted by: Vanessa Kaster, Esq., LL.M.

http://iplegalfreebies.wordpress.com/

The Federation Bells park in Melbourne has lunched an open call for composers to submit compositions to be Fed bells picplayed on a fascinating instillation of 39 bells.

The Federation Bells are a (recently refurbished) collection of 39 bronze upturned bells mounted on poles in a grid arrangement at Birrarung Marr in central Melbourne. They can be played using a sophisticated electromechanical system, in which internal hammers strike the bells, triggered by simple MIDI commands.

Submitted compositions can be heard daily on an evolving weekly schedule that is posted online.  My friend Rob Waring’s composition titled, “Daybreak at Birrarung Marr”, is currently scheduled to play daily. (Bravo, Rob!)

To encourage folks to submit compositions, the Federation Bells website features an online composition tool that lets folks compose music for the 39 bells.  A composer’s manual and guide is also posted on their website at http://federationbells.com.au/media/Federation-Bells-Composers-Manual.pdf.

The Terms and Conditions for submitting a composition also have a nice ring to them.  By submitting a composition folks agree to: 1)  grant a license allowing their composition to be played on the bell instillation for one year (composer retains ownership) and 2) submit their composition freely without seeking any further consideration.  Additionally, some folks may earn royalties if they are a member of APRA (or an equivalent society) and there is no promise made that submitted compositions will be performed.  (Terms and Conditions are always subject to change).

Federation Bells Terms and Conditions

An image of the Terms and Conditions from the website 

Evidently, over a hundred compositions have already been submitted.  As I type this, I am singing to myself, “ding dong merrily on high in heaven the bells are ringing.”  The melody and lyric of this carol seem fitting.

BY: Vanessa Kaster, Esq., LL.M.

For personalized legal services you are welcome to contact me at vk@kasterlegal.com

See also: Rob Waring’s website http://home.broadpark.no/~rwaring/; Information about composing for the Federation Bells at http://federationbells.com.au/play-the-bells/composing-for-the-bells; http://federationbells.com.au/media/Federation-Bells-Composers-Manual.pdf ; and http://composer.federationbells.com.au/FederationBells.html; @iplegalfreebies and www.kasterlegal.com.

 

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